Advertisement

RAPTS – An empowerment to the medical postgraduates

Published:March 29, 2020DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cegh.2020.02.004

      Keywords

      A quote from the great physician, Sir William Osler says ‘the medical teacher is not at a high pedestal pumping knowledge into passive receptacles, but a senior student eager to help his juniors”, from Student life. All doctors should gain a basic understanding of skills in teaching and learning during their undergraduate and postgraduate education and training. However, those with significant involvement in teaching and training will need more specialized skills. Medical Education principles have evolved as a prime area of education to students, and faculty members in recent times. Post graduate medical curriculum is usually devoted to developing competencies in the specialty concerned, patient care and submitting dissertations. Good Medical Practice says if you are involved in teaching you must develop the skills, attitudes and practices of a competent teacher. Being a teacher is not innate and the skills and attributes can be acquired.
      Post graduate students serve as undergraduate medical students primary teachers especially for practical and clinical skills and more than 20% of the postgraduate's time is spent on teaching activities and provide 20–70% of clinical teaching for medical students. Studies have shown that postgraduate student's knowledge increases by teaching UG students than by self-study.
      • Wilson F.C.
      Residents as teachers.
      The importance of postgraduate students in undergraduate medical education is that they have a positive impact upon students, their knowledge base is considerable and growing rapidly, they are where the learners (undergraduate students) want to be, they may not be the expert but they can serve as the bridge and facilitate self learning in students. Despite this critical role as teachers very few PG programs provide this kind of formal training in teaching methods, but our medical college has been a forerunner in medical education. The regulatory bodies like MCI have developed norms and guidelines to be adopted by Universities and Health care institutions for Medical College Faculty by conducting Faculty development workshops and Advanced Training in Medical Education. One of the obstacles identified in teaching effectiveness by Postgraduates/residents is lack of knowledge of the principles of adult learning and teaching techniques and importance of learning objectives.
      • Weiss V.
      • Needlman R.
      To teach is to learn twice: resident teachers learn more.
      While postgraduates receive good training in their core subjects and reasonably adequate exposure to research and patient care, it is ironical that the need to horn their teaching skills, which is an indispensable requirement of any medical college, is not given due importance. Our medical college has taken the initiative of providing teaching skills training during the postgraduate training period itself as Postgraduates are the first teachers to the undergraduate students. While structured faculty development programs under the preview of the MCI are being conducted for faculty since 2009, this workshop aimed at training future medical teachers assumes significance. A systematic review has identified that there are limited studies in evaluating residents as teachers after providing them training.
      • Post R.E.
      • Quattlebaum R.G.
      • Benich J.J.
      Residents-as-Teachers curricula: a critical review.
      RAPTS (Ramachandra Annual Postgraduate Teaching Skills Workshop), as we have named it is to develop teaching skills in order to get the rapt attention of the UG students. Workshop for Postgraduates was conceptualized to train the medical postgraduates on medical education principles and skills. This training program will make a meaningful contribution to the scientific community by improving the teaching skills of postgraduate students of medical college who will become teaching faculty of several medical Colleges. This workshop is the first of its kind to be undertaken by any medical college, targeting faculty development of postgraduates. This training program was initiated in the year 2014 and is going on successfully till date. We have received appreciation and positive feedback from the students. This workshop is aimed at providing interactive scientific sessions and group activity sessions on key Medical Education topics that will promote teaching skills among postgraduate students and also to emphasize on motivation, Communication, team work and collaborative leadership that are some of the healthy trends in medical education. The sessions of this workshop include importance of learning objectives and hands on session on preparation of learning objectives, Different teaching learning methods with interactive demonstration of small group teaching as teaching techniques vary with content, venue, and group size. Small group teaching differs from the lecture format in that, in the former, content is delivered in small bites based on data generated from the patient, and opportunities to display collaborative, motor, and attitudinal behaviors are more frequent, Use of different teaching learning methods and media, Learning styles in education, E-Learning as technology enables teaching and learning especially in current tech-savvy students, Mentoring - ability to support, motivate, encourage and mentor students, and enthuse them about caring for patients, Good communication, including presentation and listening skills. This training workshop has an elaborate microteaching session, helping the postgraduates in improving their pedagogic skills. The session on reflection and feedback enhances self‐assessment, learning from experience and developing critical thinking skills.
      Sensitizing the postgraduates on medical education principles is also the need of the hour as the undergraduate medical curriculum has undergone substantial revision in its methodology and is now competency based undergraduate medical curriculum incorporating several innovative teaching learning methods. Postgraduates are the first contact teachers for undergraduates and the undergraduate students look upon them as the mentors. Teaching is an inherent skill that has be developed in postgraduate who will be teaching the undergraduates during their post graduation and also are the future teachers. Hence it is important for the postgraduates to have a program like the RAPTS as part of the postgraduate curriculum. With such training programs during post graduation followed by FDP, more teachers and trainers can be enabled to provide high quality teaching.

      Declaration of competing interest

      The authors declare that there is no conflict of interests regarding the publication of this paper.

      References

        • Wilson F.C.
        Residents as teachers.
        J Bone Joint Surg Am. 2001; 83: 1441-1443
        • Weiss V.
        • Needlman R.
        To teach is to learn twice: resident teachers learn more.
        Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 1998; 152: 190-192
        • Post R.E.
        • Quattlebaum R.G.
        • Benich J.J.
        Residents-as-Teachers curricula: a critical review.
        Acad Med. 2009; 84: 374-380